Rethinking equitable access to higher education in Africa – Fxsad

Rethinking equitable access to higher education in Africa

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Rethinking equitable access to higher education in Africa


Access to education is not only a basic human right but also critical to the development of societies and communities. photo Jeff Angote | NMG

Access to education is not only a basic human right but also critical to the development of societies and communities.

It is now well understood that education increases people’s employment opportunities and raises their income levels, thereby contributing to the overall growth and prosperity of individuals, families, communities and countries.

However, access to quality education remains a challenge for many African communities.

The quality of education children receive is greatly affected by their environment, which is characterized by a lack of essential learning materials such as books, technology and other educational supplies.

While efforts by governments and development partners to address basic education are admirable, higher education has not received attention.

Also read: Ministry of Education is reaching out to itself.

Several prestigious universities across the continent continue to produce high-performing individuals who contribute greatly to society.

However, these universities have faced a fair challenge.

For example, they have limited access to technology, which means they are unable to adopt modern teaching methods, develop creativity and contribute to the development of society.

As a result, most students in these institutions are not encouraged to engage in critical thinking, creativity and innovation, and lack the necessary broad literacy skills related to information, technology, media and finance. It makes their knowledge practical in their communities and makes them globally competitive.

This is a critical gap that needs to be addressed.

We need to find ways to harness the potential of some of our young students to sit on the international stage and move at the same pace as the rest.

In this regard, the role of initiatives such as the Kenya Scholars Access Program (KENSAP) should be recognised.

KENSAP has been providing opportunities for bright but needy African students to study abroad.

Read: Brake to increase spending on education, says survey

So far, they have helped over 250 bright but underprivileged Kenyan students get quality education at some of the world’s most prestigious universities, including Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Stanford and Yale.

In the year Since 2004, the value of university financial support has been 8.5 billion shs.

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